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The DIAL

The DIAL at Fuller Brush - 3580 Main St., Building 10
 
In addition to regular OSH hours ... 

OPENING RECEPTION 
SATURDAY NOV. 11 4-7 PM
ENTRANCE AT BACK LOADING DOCK

The DIAL is located in the historic Fuller Brush Building near the Hartford-Windsor border (take Windsor Avenue Exit off I-91).

THE DIAL is a studio, darkroom and pop-up gallery. The space provides a forum for collective dialogue and collaboration among emerging and young artists with broadly-defined photographic, photofilmic, video works and sculptural practices.
 

             
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WORKS BY:
Richard Max Gavrich, richardmaxgavrich.com
Archival Pigment Prints.
 
Josh Sheldon Art, imonlyjoshingyou@gmail.com, Geometric welded sculpture
 
Emily Cappa, emilycappa.com
Sophie Davis, cargocollective.com/sophiemdavis, Color archival pigment prints
Kenneth Dunne, kennethdunne.com, Color archival pigment prints
Noah Gavrich, noahgavrich.com, Black and white archival pigment prints
Hugh Hopkins, hughhopkins.com, 35mm slides and hand processed 16mm films
Mari Kon, marielkon.com, Color archival pigment prints
Audrey Ryan,  audreyryan.com
Rosemary Warren, rosywarren.com, Color archival pigment prints
 
>>>   ENTRANCE AT LOADING DOCK  <<<

DIRECTIONS FROM WINDSOR TOWN CENTER

Head south on Main St for 4.5 miles. The Fuller Brush Building will be on the left side of the street. At the stoplight at the south side of the building (look for the green 3580 Main St. sign), make a left into the lot and proceed straight to the back loading dock.

DIRECTIONS FROM I-91 N
Take exit for Windsor Ave. Turn left on Main St. At the stoplight at the south side of the building (look for the green 3580 Main St. sign), make a left into the lot and proceed straight to the back loading dock.

DIRECTIONS FROM DOWNTOWN HARTFORD
Head north on Main St for 3 miles. At the stoplight on the south, turn right (just before the green 3580 sign) and proceed to the back loading dock.

“The DIAL will endeavor to occupy a station on which the light may fall; which is open to the rising sun; and from which it may correctly report the progress of the hour and the day.”
George Ripley, May 4, 1840

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